Monday, January 25, 2010

AND YOUR POINT IS...?


I let this one sit for a while and then looked at it again and thought about colors...what color to use to offset the darks of the crows...how to use blocks of colors around them...

This is where I am for now.

I'm pleased with the look of the first finished crow but am wondering about that larger one that's cut with a block of color...may have been a mistake. We'll see...
Here's a closeup to show the first crow. There are a lot of different colors in that "black" but mostly cool colors so I played the warms off that.




17 comments:

Watercolors by Susan Roper said...

For what it is worth, here is what I see...your use of complementary orange for the blocks is great, the whole composition sings.

Secondly, I like the large crow that is cut into by the orange block, to me it adds dimension and depth to the piece.

Thirdly, (that word always makes me wonder if there really IS such a word!) I like the triangular cutouts in the blocks that echo the shapes of the birds' beaks.

One suggestion, if it is not too late, how about leaving some of the lightest lights in the wings of each bird, like you did in the initial stages? It seems it might give the birds more modeling by creating that shiny look? Just a thought.

I am thinking I am going to love this one....

RHCarpenter said...

Thanks, Susan, these are all good points! This one just happened without me really vocalizing what I'm going for because I wasn't sure what it was - but you have pointed out things that are working (that just came out) so I'll roll with that and I'll TRY to keep some whites in the birds but you know me - that little voice says: Paint that white in!! ha ha I hope you love it when I'm done :)

Vicki Greene said...

I am really liking this one. Great colors and the birds look great.

debwardart said...

Interesting painting, not your usual style, but I like it.
Sincerely,
Cap'n Quack Sparrow!

Cathy Gatland said...

This is looking stunning Rhonda - as Susan says, it sings, and your finished crow is perfect. I like the larger one as a graphic element, and in fact I like it just as it is, quite loosely sketched in contrast to the two 'main actors'.

Rondell said...

I say you can never go wrong with the color purple. First, it's regal as hell. And second, Alice Walker wrote herself a book about it.

Christiane Kingsley said...

Rhonda, I think that Susan has said it all:-) I totally agree with her third point ( not trying for a pun:-)

I usually don't like crows since there are simply too many in my area, but I already like this painting. I admire your creativity.

RHCarpenter said...

Thanks, Vicki :) Deb, I have a style? Could you tell me what it is, please, as I seem to be all over the place! ha ha
Thanks, Cathy, Rondelle and Christiane :) I probably love crows because there are not many around here, Christiane. I find them something other than the usual thing...a bit of mystery and darkness and...something I can't put my finger on.

Sandy Maudlin said...

Rhonda,
I REALLY like what you're doing here. It's playful yet carries a message that seems to be obscured just enuf to make it intriguing. And of course you have a style, just like your own handwriting is yours. It really shows up here.

For what this is worth, I love that orange in front of the big crow, since it makes him extra impt. The thing that is puzzling is how the bigger crow looks further back than the other two, meaning that in real life, he's a REALLY big crow. Idea for a title maybe??? Don't think you should change anything to try to make him smaller or them bigger. The painting's so fresh and dynamic. Loving it.

Nick said...

Boy too much to say here, too many ideas for a blog post! Most important to me would be keeping the large white areas, I think they are right, and I like the pencil lines, give a whole other dimension and different type of surprise/detail. But I assume those white areas are about to be filled in? Or already have been! :) One thing I would strive for this kind of piece is avoiding evidence of brushwork in the color blocks around the perimeter.

Joan Sandford-Cook said...

Hey Rhonda - such inspiration. Balance of colours cool and warm. Not sure why the third bird on the right is the largest being its appearing further back. Understand you have still to finish 'him', but really like the pair. Love the way you tackle a piece of work developing it as you feel.

RHCarpenter said...

Good comments, Sandy, Nick and Joan :) Thanks for giving me some critique as I move along. Nick, nothing else has been done on this - I like the idea of the whites but although my mind loves whites my brush-in-hand seems to want to cover them all so I'll think about those whites and where they would best be left (you're not the only one to say that but thanks for the anti-brushstroke comment for the color blocks = right on and easy to do with wet-in-wet fun :)
Wanted to say a special hello and welcome to Rondelle (I usually give a special hello to any new commenter and got carried away yesterday and put you in with other commenters.) I always appreciate it when a new person comes along, looks and takes the time to comment - hope you return (and I have been having a fun time at your blog reading about your trip to the art museum :)
Sandy, can't make BIG CROW any smaller at this point and I'm thinking since I'm playing with "don'ts" on this one, I'll leave him large although he's not a main character...we'll see what comes out when people see this - some will say, "That can't be right." And others will say, "Why not?" :)
Again, thank YOU ALL for these great comments, ideas, suggestions, etc. Whether I use them or not, they are always food for thought for next time, right?

Elizabeth Seaver said...

I think you are on to something here. It is an original composition and dynamic. I'm looking forward to seeing how you finish it.

Gillian said...

Your crows are amazing! Very nice work.

Happy birthday! You're just a young'un then...... ^_~

RHCarpenter said...

Thanks so much, Elizabeth and Gillian (and thanks for the birthday wishes - ah, if I only still felt 35 instead of 53!).

Nick said...

It's the kind of thing I'd put away for a while because there are too many possibilities. Fresh eyes.
When a passage appears as though it's trying to be "perfect," those types of brushstrokes usually detract. But in your newer piece, you took a different tack...embracing the anomalies of the medium sometimes is the best way to go. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Or as I like to say, "If you can't join them, confound them!" (jazzman's rule for onstage survival)

RHCarpenter said...

Give 'em the old razzle dazzle, Nick? Sounds like a plan...haven't touched a brush in days and am yearning to get back to something old or something new - just something!