Friday, May 8, 2009

Every Green in May: Olive Green + Perylene Green

1. Olive Green (Daniel Smith brand)
A mix of Aureolin (PY 40), Ultramarine Blue (PB 29), and Raw Umber (PBr 7).

A Very Good Lightfast, Low Staining, Granulating, Semi-Transparent pigment mix.

Well, sorry, folks, but as soon as I read that it has Aureolin in the mix, I knew I'd toss this one on the discard pile. Aureolin turns brown over time so what do you think this green will do over time? No, thanks, won't take the chance. Off it goes! (I wasn't that crazy about the color anyway.)

2. Perylene Green (Daniel Smith)

A single pigment, no mix, according to DS. However, the single pigment is PBk 31 which means it is a black pigment. Interesting...

Daniel Smith describes this as an Excellent Lightfast, Medium Staining, Non-granulating, Semi-Transparent single pigment.

Because this is a black mix that has gone to a deep, dark green, it makes gorgeous northwest forests, and it fades out to a misty, foggy, gray-green that is very nice. I think I'll keep this one in my To Use More Often pile. I could see doing some misty seascapes with this color.

So far I've covered 8 different tube greens made by Daniel Smith. For someone who is afraid of greens, rarely uses them, and doesn't really know how to use them, I sure have a lot of tube greens! Ah, the exuberance of youth when I first started painting and had to have every single color. Wait until you see some of the more exotic greens yet to come...

9 comments:

debwardart said...

Even though you let me down on Wednesday and I suffered a severe caffeine depression, I'm still reading your blog and enjoying learning something from you constantly! :-)
Congrats on your winning the giveaway paintings and painting from Myrna, that certainly was a kind gesture on her part - enjoy all of your winnings!!!

Kay said...

I am interested in your comment about aureolin yellow turning brown over time. I have never noticed any problems with it... how much time are you meaning? I have been using it for around 20 years.

Looking forward to back-tracking on your blog... have only discovered it today.
:-)

RHCarpenter said...

Thanks, Deb, I'm glad you're still checking out my blog :)
Kay, check out these artists and researchers about aureolin:
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/watery.html#PY40
and
http://www.hilarypage.com/#page7
and I have to say my own watercolor teacher tested Aureolin and found it did develop a brownish caste over time - months, not years.

Vicki Greene said...

I am enjoying your study of greens. I need to do some studies and color charts too.

RHCarpenter said...

Thanks, Vicki. I am hoping to get some time today to get back to the flamingo painting - just haven't had time.

Chris Beck said...

Hi Rhonda -- I'm still catching up on blog reading. I love to mix sap green with Quinacridone Sienna for a lively olive green.

RHCarpenter said...

Never tried Quin Sienna, Chris - OMG, a color I don't have?!?!? ha ha

Chris Beck said...

Rhonda, I'm shocked!! How did you miss that one? ;-D Seriously, it is one of the BEST colors -- makes super darks with ultramarine blue too.

RHCarpenter said...

Chris, I have these greens and then I rarely rarely use them - another reason why I'm testing them out, seeing which ones I want to keep and which ones have to go.