Friday, October 11, 2013

ACRYLIC INK + WATERCOLOR


Stage 1.  

Drawing on watercolor paper (140# cold press Fabriano) with masking fluid used around some of the objects but not everything.  Acrylic ink colors dripped and dabbed on the very wet paper to blend and move.






Stage 2.

Watercolor painted over the dried acrylic paint - paper is painted on while dry, not pre-wet.  Darkening and shaping some of the objects.  (Not happy about the leaves in the "center" behind the berries that looks like a really big, really green hummingbird!  Masking fluid still on at this stage.





Stage 3.

Masking fluid removed.  Look at all that white paper I have to blend or cover?  This is really the ugly stage - I think.










Stage 4.

More watercolor painted over the acylic underpainting.  Cropped a bit more and some more leaves faked around - which don't look right.  Big green hummingbird still there :(


Well, I can't really call this successful but I know why it failed and will do better next time.  I'll consider this a test and a trial of the technique.  I don't like painting around and blending the whites left by the masking fluid - maybe I can paint something without all the whites?  I have another photo chosen to try and will think about this more before drawing it out.  

No comments necessary.  I wouldn't want you to try to be kind and tell me it's okay! ha ha


15 comments:

Helen H Trachy said...

Hi there! I think you're too hard on yourself. I do love the result and your your mix of colors is just beautiful. Will be back for more. :)

humbird said...

Rhonda...but hummingbird wanted to sit there...why did you resist? and masking liquid...how did you apply it? so interesting to watch these stages of your work! Thank you for sharing!

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Helen :) There are things I like about it - it's not a total waste of pigment! ha ha Just not what I envisioned, I guess.

Humbird, yes, I guess I should have just made him or her a little irridescent hummingbird? Maybe I can still do that with the acrylic inks...I applied the masking fluid with the end of a wooden skewer, dipping the end in the masking fluid and then touching and moving it to the paper - but it was a bit blobby when I first touched it to the paper...probably a better way or maybe I need new masking fluid.

Sadami said...

Hi, Rhonda, I'd say, "It's okay!!" Thanks for sharing the precious process.
Cheers, Sadami

Barb Sailor said...

Well - I also think you are being too hard on yourself - I think it is lovely, and you certainly have the technique down pat. I think this is dynamic! Remember, Mr. clean can help with the edges of the mask.

CrimsonLeaves said...

Funny your last comment. LOL I really like this and feel it is one of your better pieces. I think it is marvelous!

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks for the reminder about the Mr. Clean, Barb :) You are too kind about this mess, though! ha ha

Sherry, well...your comment makes me wonder if I'm just seeing the struggle with this - and the failure to make good leaves and do any negative painting (never been something I can "see" and do). Perhaps I'll soften some edges, put it away and look at it again in a month or so.

Pam Johnson Brickell said...

Ya but..... what a great jumping off spot! I, too, think you're being too hard on yourself. This is a journal page experiment that I thank you so for sharing. Great possibilities here! Mr Clean for getting rid of hard edges? How about the chemicals left behind? Curious :)

http://carolking.wordpress.com said...

I like this very much Rhonda. I think you are too critical of this piece.

RH Carpenter said...

You're right, Pam - just an experiment and I'll do it again and think more! ha ha The Mr. Clean is the Magic Eraser and I don't use it on my paper except in this case I think I will. I've heard of many watercolor and acrylic painters who use it to lift up dried paint and soften edges, though, without any harsh results. But it does have chemicals in the sponge and I wonder about that in the future - like salt that you don't get off the paper can eat through the fibers (so I've been told).

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Carol. I think maybe my struggle with it is clouding my vision of it because others like it - even my Sweetie (who has a critical eye).

Katherine Thomas said...

This is fantastic! I really like this style and the paints you combined in this technique created a very stunning, unique look. I admire you for experimenting and asking yourself 'what if...'. That's how the greatest works of art are born!

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Katherine :)

Debbie Nolan said...

Dear Rhonda - I think this is lovely...your colors are stunning and actually the green hummingbird in the background adds interest. Keep doing what you are doing...the results are wonderful.

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Debbie. Even though I don't think it is successful, I'm going to take it to the next watercolor society meeting and show what I did, using Barb's technique.