Friday, April 19, 2013

WORKSHOP STRUGGLES





Here are several small paintings I tried in the Christopher Leeper workshop.  I was much too timid with the darks, not mixing enough variety in my greens, not seeing the colors as well as I should.  (The top two are all mine - of course, you can probably tell that!)





I really struggled and did enough whining that Chris came over and, after asking my permission (the sign of a good teacher!), took my brush and palette and turned my mess into an evening scene with the shadows stretching out.  He even put a night glowing sun behind the trees on the left.





 Explaining, as he did so, that every single change affected every other thing in the painting.  So much thinking.  And I do know this for everything but when it comes to landscapes, well, I am landscape challenged!  But I will continue to struggle and practice and someday I will be able to do a decent one - I hope.



And here is my final effort, done at home a few days after the workshop was over and I had recuperated and got some energy and brain power back.  Not as horrible as the 1st two versions, but still a bit too timid and tight?

Not going to beat myself up about this.  Just something else I need to learn and study and practice before getting comfortable and getting the ideas ingrained in my little head.  And every little change effects everything else - not used to painting outside, plein air painting can feel strange and it may take a while to know what to take and what to leave behind.  Not painting landscapes, it seems strange to paint them and make my mind work around - I know about composition, value, colors, and shapes but cannot (yet) move that thinking and learning to landscapes for some reason.  But I will!


10 comments:

Mrs A said...

Greens are so difficult but it sounds and looks as though you are getting it! I think thank goodness for the Christopher Leepers of this world who help us learn! It is so easy to give up when not happy with something but you show us what you can do with perseverance. Thankyou for your post, Mrs A

Lorraine Brown said...

Well at least you are trying and giving a good shot at it, I too struggle with landscapes and they not appear on paper anything like they are in my head. I avoid them which is a bit of a cop out

Barb Sailor said...

Rhonda - I think you enjoyed the workshop with Chris Leeper. I have taken 2 with him and had such a good time and learned a lot. I think you did a good job with your paintings. I find that landscapes are very difficult to paint - you are not alone.
I love the painting at the top of your blog. It is wonderful.

Sharon Whitley said...

It looks like you've learned a lot there, I suppose to keep practicing while the info is fresh in your head. I struggle a lot with landscapes and tend to avoid them but really should challenge myself! Your final version is really good by the way, I'd be happy if I painted it!

CrimsonLeaves said...

Rhonda, I have to say that I love your last attempt at the landscape. You've so beautifully captured how the water meets the land and you've managed some beautiful color effects in your trees. Personally, I'd frame that one for sure. And if we quit learning then what is the point? I always embrace learning new things. I'd be a student (official) forever if I could.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for 'describing' your struggles... and power to be sure you will get over it by practising!!! I think we all recognise, good to share!
I think your last effort indeed has much better turned out. (and I think it IS already a nice painting!)

http://carolking.wordpress.com said...

Hi Rhonda, I enjoyed reading all your posts about the Leeper workshop. I like the final painting here.

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks so much, Mrs. A. Good teachers are a blessing!

Lorraine, Barb, Sharon, thanks - seems like many of us are landscape challenged! ha ha

Thanks, Sherry, Anonymous and Carol :) I'll keep plugging away.

Kevin Neal said...

I saw the last attempt as very close to what you would want. I would personally make some stronger lines in the front to create the depth. And if I find myself being timid, I start bulldozing through with careless strokes...sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. But it definitely loosens me up.

RH Carpenter said...

Kevin, you're right - timidity can ruin a painting quicker than anything!!! Bulldozer through the fear - what's to lose except paint and paper?