Wednesday, January 12, 2011

WINTER TREES + RAVENS UPDATE

Another few inches of snow here, and an early morning peek at the sliver of moon in the trees made me want to share a poem with you.


Winter Trees

by William Carlos Williams


All the complicated details
of the attiring and
the disattiring are completed!


A liquid moon
moves gently among
the long branches.


Thus having prepared their buds
against a sure winter
the wise trees
stand sleeping in the cold.


And my ravens aren't cooperating.  I've had to use drastic measures on them...


I've cropped off the 5th raven on the right side and all that pink. 

This may be a do-over after going back to the photo to see what appealed to me in the first place about it and made me want to paint the ravens.  (My ravens don't look big and bold enough - more like crows - now how did that happen? ha ha)

18 comments:

Ann Buckner said...

I liked that 5th raven with that wonderful color behind him. Of course it all comes down to personal taste. :) Curious to see what you decide about this one.

Watercolors by Susan Roper said...

I think you have lost the look of the Yellowstone Ravens in this, but in doing so you have gained the look of wonderful realism set against an abstract background. Stop analyzing this and start saying "I meant to do it this way"!

I am reminded of a story I heard from Terry Madden on Public TV where he was painting one of his juicy watercolors. He said that he and his wife had owned both cats and dogs and he was amazed at the differences between the species. He said that a dog would come running into a room, and run right into a sliding patio door, look around to see if anyone saw him and then slink out of the room in embarassed silence. A cat, however, would do the same thing, jump up and turn around and say "I knew that door was there and I meant to do that"! He said that was called a "cattitude" and that was what watercolorists had to develop, a cattitude.

So, Rhonda, just say you meant to do this painting this way! LOL

Gretchen Bjornson ART said...

I should probably "google" a crow and raven so I know the difference. I wouldn't have thought any different about what they were because you said they were ravens in the title. Maybe an orinthologist would tell the difference. I think it's coming along nicely....keep going!

Christiane Kingsley said...

Rhonda, I think that I much prefer this new composition. I really like the background with those beautiful drips.And who says the birds have to be ravens...crows would do as well:-) I think this is turning out extremely well.

RH Carpenter said...

Sorry, Ann. Maybe that 5th bird will have to return in another painting?

Susan, you made me laugh! I don't think I have much cattitude and my feeling is that someone might learn something from my mistakes (heaven knows I'm not learning from them! ha ha).

Gretchen, a crow is a bit leaner and has a thinner bill - ravens are chunky things with large, heavy bills. I'm sure an ornithologist would tell me other differences, but as far as looks, that's about it.

Thanks, Christiane. I'm glad you like the changes.

Joan Sandford-Cook said...

Designers say even numbers work best for the human eye, but you seem to have pulled it off with this cropped version. I see why you wanted to removed the 5th with that pink background as it was drawing the eye to the sides and not the main subject... but I still liked it.

Peggy Stermer-Cox said...

I still like this one; it seems full of potential. It will be interesting to see what you come up with.

RH Carpenter said...

Joan, I've always heard to use odd numbers in paintings for design sake but I think the lines add up as the 5th element in this one so it works okay.

Peggy, thanks. I hope you ride along for the finish :)

Debbie said...

Rhonda.... no matter what they are supposed to be, you did a great job! I like your background adding to a bit of an abstracty look. If you are taking this further.... I'll be waiting to see the result eagarly!

MB Shaw said...

Brilliant crop. I realize the odd number thing and all that, but I think you completely saved the painting with this crop. Love the abstraction (well, duh, you knew I would say that) and focusing on the bird a bit closer. I think it takes courage to crop out a section of a painting - you took a chance and it worked!! :)

L Young said...

Gosh, Rhonda! I love the way you have progessed on this. I think it's great the way it is. The abstract background contrasted with the realism ravens...is really good. You've done a great job camoflaging the previous railroad ties.

Caroline said...

Well done Rhonda I think these feathery guys look great! It is not an easy subject but you have pulled it off very well. I love the poem too.

hw (hallie) farber said...

I agree with Katherine Thomas' comment from yesterday. This is becoming awesome--it's fun following the development of this painting.

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Debbie. I'm remiss about checking in on my blogger friends but have to tell you I love your rhino painting :)

Thanks, Mary Beth and Linda :) My motto is "When in doubt, crop it out!" ha ha

Thanks, Caroline and Hallie. I'm hoping someone gets something out of my fumbling attempts - otherwise, I'd just show the jewels in the crown (which would mean I'd only post once a week or so).

debwardart said...

I like this one better; it's bolder and reads better. Wonder if we get crows or ravens or starlings out here!

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Deb. Still have to put the bird eyes in and tweak a little bit but mostly done. Yes, you have crows!!! I've seen about 1/2 dozen on my trip up to your place once I turn past your gate - they always fly away from the car, though.

Carol King said...

I like watching the journey of the ravens. I can't wait to see how it will be completed.

RH Carpenter said...

Carol, thanks. Not much more to do to finish them - eyes and a bit more darks in some and we'll see where they take me. I'm itching to start another but feel like I need to finish the still life before jumping into another crow or raven painting.