Friday, January 14, 2011

SHAKER VILLAGE STILL LIFE + SMALL SKETCHES



Just a bit more work on the Shaker Village still life...slowly but surely I need to build up the colors in the warm elements.  Not sure how I'm going to tackle the corn but definitely not photo-realistic.  I hope to be able to keep that loose with enough detail to suggest corn.











And a couple of sketches done while taking a break from the Egon Schiele biography.

The first one is a la Egon but isn't a copy of any of his work in the book.




















The second was done while watching the Twilight: New Moon movie.  I haven't read the books and only watch the movies when they show up on cable TV (so much teenaged angst gets me down).

12 comments:

AK said...

The painting is coming up really well. Just go on.

Gretchen Bjornson ART said...

I tried to keep up with the whole Harry Potter experience, but got left behind at book 2.
I like the colors of the still life. It may not be photo realistic, but it definitely has a style.

RH Carpenter said...

Thank you so much, Asit. I really enjoyed your last painting and your return to your home village.

Gretchen, I didn't even try with the Harry Potter, just watching one movie and then letting the others slide by. No, I didn't want it to be photo-realistic, but more loose and I find myself getting a bit tight with this one. I do like the warm colors (nice on a cold winter's day to paint warm colors).

Katherine Thomas said...

It's a gorgeous painting already. How did you set up the still life? Do you use a spot light?

Christiane Kingsley said...

The still life is lovely - love the contrast between the highlights and the darks!

hw (hallie) farber said...

Painting plus sketching. I love the wood grain in the painting. I have wanted to "Sheile-sketch" today. If I start I will be lost in it (and some things need to be done this weekend).

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Katherine. I shot a couple of photos while visiting Shaker Village in Kentucky. The room was dark but light was coming from a window above the items on the table.

Christiane, the contrast of light and dark in the photo was what made me want to try this one in watercolor and see if I could get that look.

Thanks, Hallie. Looking at the drawings and paintings in the book does influence your sketching a bit - you become more angular :)

Watercolors by Susan Roper said...

Rhonda...tight or not I think this is just right so far with the values, so keep on keepin' on with this and preserve those wonderful values. I like the painterly realism of the elements you have painted so far and hope you can retain enough of that for the corn cobs. With corn cobs, it seems to me that you either have to go for realism or very impressionistic (almost abstract), there isn't much in between with those. So, since the other elements are so well-drawn and painterly yet realistic I wouldn't get too wishy-washy with the corn? That is just IMHO, but I'm gonna say it anyway.

This is going to be a very strong painting and I just know I will love it with all of those warm colors.

W. K. Moore said...

Hi RH - thought I'd pop in and take a look around your gallery. I see many good things and I enjoyed reading about Egon. Keep up the energy.. the year is just beginning.

RH Carpenter said...

Susan, I know what you mean - I can't be too wishy-washy with the corn or it won't fit with the rest of the painting...I have to find a way to make it look more finished but keep that washy look I want in the corn and sheaves.

Bill, so pleased you stopped by and commented and are looking around. I tend to have bursts of energy and paint a lot very quickly, then take a break for a few days :) So much to paint, so little time.

Vicki Greene said...

Your painting is looking good. I really admire your wood grain.

RH Carpenter said...

Thanks, Vicki. It's coming along slowly but surely.